Girls... Less Likely to...?

THE L.A TIMES | January 26, 2017 | Amina Khan Contact Reporter

The LA Times reports on an interesting fact about girls and boys. By the age of 6, guess what happens in to girls vs. boys! We need to help create awareness about this and change this statistic!

 

An eight-wheel rover demonstrates its mobility system by rolling over kids at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. By age 6, some girls have internalized the stereotype that someone who is "very, very smart" is a man, not a woman. (Katie Falkenberg / For The Times)

An eight-wheel rover demonstrates its mobility system by rolling over kids at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. By age 6, some girls have internalized the stereotype that someone who is "very, very smart" is a man, not a woman. (Katie Falkenberg / For The Times)

By age 6, girls are less likely than boys to think that they can be brilliant, 

study shows

 

Why do so few women end up in physics, mathematics and other fields traditionally associated with “brilliance”? Part of the answer may lie in what happens to girls by the time they’re out of kindergarten.

A new study finds that 6-year-old girls are less likely than boys to think members of their own gender can be brilliant — and they’re more likely than boys to shy away from activities requiring that exceptional intelligence. That’s a serious change from their attitudes at age 5, when they’re just as likely as boys to think their own gender can be brilliant, and just as willing to take on those activities for brilliant children.  

amina.khan@latimes.com

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UPDATES:

6:20 p.m.: This story was updated with comment from Yarrow Dunham and additional context. 

This article was originally published at 11:50 a.m.

Copyright © 2017, Los Angeles Times

Source: http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/...